Please register or Login
MuskieFIRST | WalleyeFIRST | SalmonFIRST | IceFishing | WhitetailFIRST | BassFIRST | OutdoorsFIRST Upload
Lake of the Woods Tourism

Muskie Discussion Forums

Forums | Calendars | Albums | Quotes | Language | Blogs Search | Statistics | User Listing
You are logged in as a guest. ( logon | register )
Moderators: sworrall, Slamr

View previous thread :: View next thread
Jump to page : 1
Now viewing page 1 [30 messages per page]

More Muskie Fishing -> Muskie Biology -> Musky Coloring
 
Message Subject: Musky Coloring
curleytail
Posted 7/30/2013 12:14 PM (#654492)
Subject: Musky Coloring




Posts: 1841


Location: Hayward, WI
Typically it seems like muskies that come from dark stained water tend to be more of a solid, olive/brown color, and those coming from clear water are lighter in color with more detailed markings.

However, some areas seem to have muskies with different types of markings on them (Vilas county muskies seem like some of the prettiest to me with green backgrounds and more striking white lines).

How much of a fish's coloring depends on the water conditions they live in vs the genetics/strain of fish?

Tucker
Flambeauski
Posted 7/30/2013 1:11 PM (#654506 - in reply to #654492)
Subject: Re: Musky Coloring




Posts: 2478


Location: Smith Creek
Seems to me that some strain's coloring are resistant to conditions and some are not. Take LL strain and stick them in coffee stained water and they stick out like a sore thumb. Shoepeks are another that's green no matter where they live.
Difficult to say on a lot of our waters that have had 10 different strains put in over the years. I've caught barred in the TFF where they are traditionally green on green, but it's been stocked extensively with different strains. Some old pics of Chequamegon Bay spots all look the same, whether they lived on rocks in the bay or weeds in the river.
esoxaddict
Posted 7/31/2013 4:48 PM (#654816 - in reply to #654492)
Subject: Re: Musky Coloring





Posts: 5189


Here's what I've noticed:

1. Coffee colored water produces coffee colored fish
2. Muddy water without much clarity produces light colored fish with very few markings
3. Clear water produces fish with very pronounced markings

But then I've caught fish from the same area that were radically different from each other in color AND markings. That I am thinking is genetics - different strain of fish. Nearly all the fish I've caught in N/WI are that same greenish brown color, but every once in a while you get one with beautiful markings. Leech strain fish always have spots and always seem to be the same color, though.

But they all smell the same...

Weird fish they are.
JKahler
Posted 8/1/2013 12:48 AM (#654882 - in reply to #654492)
Subject: Re: Musky Coloring




Posts: 1201


Location: WI
I've caught leechers that are olive gray on the sides with spots, and ones that are very light colored in the same lake. Another local lake the leechers are very light colored, almost albino. In the St Louis river I've caught WI strain in a number of different color patterns. Even caught a fish in a small WI lake that was bright gold! Wish I would have taken a picture of that one!
Flambeauski
Posted 8/1/2013 9:02 AM (#654908 - in reply to #654816)
Subject: Re: Musky Coloring




Posts: 2478


Location: Smith Creek
esoxaddict - 7/31/2013 4:48 PM

Here's what I've noticed:

1. Coffee colored water produces coffee colored fish
2. Muddy water without much clarity produces light colored fish with very few markings
3. Clear water produces fish with very pronounced markings

But then I've caught fish from the same area that were radically different from each other in color AND markings. That I am thinking is genetics - different strain of fish. Nearly all the fish I've caught in N/WI are that same greenish brown color, but every once in a while you get one with beautiful markings. Leech strain fish always have spots and always seem to be the same color, though.

But they all smell the same...

Weird fish they are.


Lundbob's 53 came out of coffee colored water. Weird indeed.
dtaijo174
Posted 8/1/2013 12:37 PM (#654944 - in reply to #654506)
Subject: Re: Musky Coloring





Posts: 952


Location: New Hope MN
Flambeauski - 7/30/2013 1:11 PM
Shoepeks are another that's green no matter where they live.


I have never caught a green shoepack strain fish. All have been brown with brown belly spots being the big key indicator. That includes fishing Shoepack lake. What a hike that was...
Flambeauski
Posted 8/1/2013 1:32 PM (#654961 - in reply to #654944)
Subject: Re: Musky Coloring




Posts: 2478


Location: Smith Creek
Pretty green if you ask me. In this stocked lake they run from a little golden to GREEN. Wish I had (digital) pics of one I caught, it was like a pike without spots.


Zoom - | Zoom 100% | Zoom + | Expand / Contract | Open New window
Click to expand / contract the width of this image
(Wisconsin07%2000005.jpg)


Zoom - | Zoom 100% | Zoom + | Expand / Contract | Open New window
Click to expand / contract the width of this image
(4937_4a5e3ed2acc0c.jpg)



Attachments
----------------
Attachments Wisconsin07%2000005.jpg (66KB - 37 downloads)
Attachments 4937_4a5e3ed2acc0c.jpg (25KB - 41 downloads)
Flambeauski
Posted 8/1/2013 2:37 PM (#654967 - in reply to #654492)
Subject: Re: Musky Coloring




Posts: 2478


Location: Smith Creek
2nd pic was taken from another website, author said he was fishing Shoepack Lake.
dtaijo174
Posted 8/1/2013 4:25 PM (#654991 - in reply to #654492)
Subject: Re: Musky Coloring





Posts: 952


Location: New Hope MN
They may be green in certain lakes. I'm not disputing that. just saying I've caught brown ones. I'll try to remember to post a pic of a few shoepackers i boated (wrong computer).

One thing is for sure, they do change their markings. That adds to the cool factor IMO!
Flambeauski
Posted 8/1/2013 8:44 PM (#655031 - in reply to #654492)
Subject: Re: Musky Coloring




Posts: 2478


Location: Smith Creek
No doubt. Just when you think all muskies on a body of water have a certain color pattern you catch an oddball that's completely different than every other fish you've caught there. My completely uneducated opinion is that its genetics.
curleytail
Posted 8/9/2013 2:20 PM (#656560 - in reply to #654492)
Subject: Re: Musky Coloring




Posts: 1841


Location: Hayward, WI
I have to wonder if it's genetics too. Most of the fish I catch tend to be fairly boring in color, with most of the fish being light olive green to darker brown, and very few markings. Have not caught a lot of fish from gin clear water, but many on only slightly stained water.

I have caught a couple on very very clear water that were still quite bland in coloring, but a few in stained water that had pronounced markings.

My two biggest fish came from different lakes. One very clear and one "mostly" clear, in two counties about an hour apart. They had somewhat similar colors and markings.

It seems like I've noticed certain size structures having similar color patterns. Also makes me think the coloring is strain related.
Brew city baits
Posted 1/19/2014 11:04 AM (#685649 - in reply to #654492)
Subject: Re: Musky Coloring




Posts: 3


There are hybread musky's as well as tiger musky! Well in wisconsinwe do!
CiscoKid
Posted 2/1/2014 9:41 AM (#688714 - in reply to #654492)
Subject: RE: Musky Coloring





Posts: 1755


Location: Oconto Falls, WI
I think it is a combination of both genetics and the water color.

Example 1 - Genetics - A lake I fish frequently has two distinctive types of fish in it. One are the greenish hued fish, and from what someone told me (I cannot verify validity) is those fish were stockers. They fight ok, but nothing out of the ordinary. The other type of fish in this lake tend to be more straight brown with brown belly spots. These are to be from the "native" strain. These fish, every one of them, fight like the dickens. It is crazy to see the difference between the two.

Example 2 - Water color - Pretty sure majority of coloring is dictated by water color, and to take it further the surroundings in that lake. Fish in the same lake have very different coloring. Those that tend to stay in weeds and around timber and other structure tend to have very distinctive markings. However fish that spend their lives in open water on those same lakes tend to be more of a solid coloring. Also fish have the ability to change their coloring based on surrounding. Think of trout/salmon coming in from the big water, and those that have been in the water awhile. The fresh run almost always are brighter in color, and have fewer markings. Those that have been in a while tend to be darker in coloring. Also think of fish you are keeping to eat. If you have a light colored livewell they usually end up being very light in color compared to how they were when you first threw them in there, and if you have a dark colored livewell sometimes the fish will actually end up getting darker in color.
Larry Ramsell
Posted 2/2/2014 9:14 AM (#688868 - in reply to #654492)
Subject: Re: Musky Coloring




Posts: 757


Location: Hayward, Wisconsin
Travis: I agree with both of your examples and would like to add another observation. In "some" waters, where the muskies have been stocked, they seem unable (at least from my observations) to modify color for camo...the water I'm referring to is very dark, but almost all of the muskies are WHITE! They actually almost glow when seen following a lure. I don't know if it is the chemistry of the water that causes this OR the possibility that them being white in that water body makes them less visible to their prey. Doesn't seem to affect their ability to grow to good size and all are very healthy.

Also, in an area where two major muskie rivers come together, coloration can be quite different; one river being darker/muddier and the other clear/clean. Very easy to tell them apart.
Jump to page : 1
Now viewing page 1 [30 messages per page]
Jump to forum :
Search this forum
Printer friendly version
E-mail a link to this thread
Lake of the Woods Tourism

(Delete all cookies set by this site)