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More Muskie Fishing -> Muskie Biology -> Nostrils
 
Message Subject: Nostrils
River2Stream
Posted 9/3/2017 2:23 PM (#876464)
Subject: Nostrils




Posts: 109


I'm sure you all have seen the pits or holes on the face of musky. I can't help but call them nostrils haha. But my question is: do these pits aid in "smelling" or are they used for a completely different biological process ?
Fishysam
Posted 9/3/2017 9:39 PM (#876478 - in reply to #876464)
Subject: Re: Nostrils




Posts: 805


Rumor has it muskies don't particularly smell bait, so I doubt it. Ps I belive they are called poors
Musky_Mo16
Posted 9/3/2017 10:00 PM (#876481 - in reply to #876478)
Subject: Re: Nostrils




Posts: 674


Location: Apparently where the Muskie aren't
What "pits", the ones that are on the top of the head (the ones that look like there would be a nose there)? Or the ones on the bottom of the lower jaw? I know the ones on the lower jaw are called poors. I also believe the one on the lower jaw can be used to distinguish between pike and Muskie, although I've never heard of a situation where that would be needed. (Maybe for on of those silver or blue pike??)
Larry Ramsell
Posted 9/4/2017 8:59 AM (#876499 - in reply to #876464)
Subject: Re: Nostrils




Posts: 1024


Location: Hayward, Wisconsin
Yes, they are used for smelling!

It is "pores" under the jaw.
Fishysam
Posted 9/4/2017 10:30 AM (#876507 - in reply to #876464)
Subject: Re: Nostrils




Posts: 805


Dang, I shouldn't have posted tired last night. Haha. They definitely have nostrils. And I just ignored that.
River2Stream
Posted 9/4/2017 7:42 PM (#876578 - in reply to #876499)
Subject: Re: Nostrils




Posts: 109


Larry Ramsell - 9/4/2017 9:59 AM

Yes, they are used for smelling!

It is "pores" under the jaw.



Thanks Larry ! Anatomically speaking the holes or pits are in a similar position of nostrils on other animals so I figured I would get a concrete answer on the matter.
Musky_Mo16
Posted 9/4/2017 10:24 PM (#876595 - in reply to #876578)
Subject: Re: Nostrils




Posts: 674


Location: Apparently where the Muskie aren't
So if the "nostril holes" are for smelling, than what do the pores on the lower jaw do?
Larry Ramsell
Posted 9/5/2017 7:56 AM (#876609 - in reply to #876464)
Subject: Re: Nostrils




Posts: 1024


Location: Hayward, Wisconsin
The pores are part of their sensory system, like the lateral line...feels vibrations.
sworrall
Posted 9/5/2017 1:39 PM (#876659 - in reply to #876464)
Subject: Re: Nostrils





Location: Rhinelander, Wisconsin
The muskie's olfactory ability is less than that of a walleye or bass, but still is a factor. I have found that the muskie's strike response to me more of a factor in getting them to go, scents, good and bad, have never done much in warm water, even for Pike, but ice...we catch lots of big pike on dead baits, and watching them literally sniff and definitely taste before hitting sometimes is cool. Don't get any muskies on dead bait, might just be bad luck, but see plenty on the Aqua-Vu.
Musky_Mo16
Posted 9/9/2017 8:33 PM (#877234 - in reply to #876659)
Subject: Re: Nostrils




Posts: 674


Location: Apparently where the Muskie aren't
Not related to muskie, but do trout have the best sense of smell? I ask because when fishing for stockers in the spring I tried using power bait (yes, cheating, I know) because they wouldn't eat anything else. I first tried the regular dough bait power bait and surprisingly didn't catch anything so after about 25minutes I switched to the heavily garlic scented power bait and started catching fish left and right. So I decided to do and experiment. What I did was take the regular power bait that the fish didn't want and I would add in a very small amount of the heavily garlic scented powerbait and that worked as good as just straight garlic scented powerbait. Maybe I'm wrong but this led me to believe that trout the best sense of smell. (Or they just like garlic)
FlyPiker
Posted 9/16/2017 12:00 PM (#878143 - in reply to #877234)
Subject: Re: Nostrils




Posts: 227


Musky_Mo16 - 9/9/2017 8:33 PM

Not related to muskie, but do trout have the best sense of smell? I ask because when fishing for stockers in the spring I tried using power bait (yes, cheating, I know) because they wouldn't eat anything else. I first tried the regular dough bait power bait and surprisingly didn't catch anything so after about 25minutes I switched to the heavily garlic scented power bait and started catching fish left and right. So I decided to do and experiment. What I did was take the regular power bait that the fish didn't want and I would add in a very small amount of the heavily garlic scented powerbait and that worked as good as just straight garlic scented powerbait. Maybe I'm wrong but this led me to believe that trout the best sense of smell. (Or they just like garlic)


I don't believe they do. When tying flies, it typically doesn't matter what kind of head cement / glue you use for trout. However when tying for carp, it is highly advised to use a water based adhesive so that the carp can not taste or smell the chemicals. In the very least, carp have a much keener sense of taste/smell than trout.
true tiger tamer
Posted 9/16/2017 9:55 PM (#878187 - in reply to #876464)
Subject: Re: Nostrils




Posts: 71


I believe catfish are supposed to have the best sense of smell, from what I've heard.
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